Recent happenings…

I’m currently on my way to Mae Sai to do a border run, necessary to keep my visa valid. I could have done a 30 day extension in town, but that’s 1900 baht, plus the cost it takes to get there and back (unknown but red trucks aren’t always super honest about places beyond the old city) and it’s super unpredictable in terms of wait time etc. 

I decided instead to just commit to being out for the day, do a border run (the tickets cost less than 500 baht return) to the Burmese border, pay my (hopefully) $10 to go into Burma (or 500baht- but the USD is a bit cheaper… but not always accepted so we’ll see!) have some lunch and a bit of an explore around the border town before hopping back on the bus. Yes, it takes longer but in the end, I think it’ll be a much better experience than sitting in an immigration office surrounded by other expats! Plus the drive is offering up some beautiful views!

Some things which have been happening recently: 

  • I organised a trip to and hiked through Doi Inthanon national park! It was an adventure from the moment I posted the notice asking if anyone wanted to join, but definitely worth it! In the end there were 7 of us who took the plunge and went on the tour, ably led by our guide “Mr P”. Throughout the trek, he told us about and showed us various herbal medicines, bush tucker (Thai style) and tools which could be found in the jungle. The hike itself was really chilled, gently undulating with some pretty intense downhills at points. There were a few slippages here and there but no one was seriously injured… despite the threat of mudfoot/bootmud/wetboot… all the names we came up with when trying to remember what trench foot was called after falling into a waterfall and soaking our socks and shoes. One highlight of the day was finding out about Mr P’s life- he was a monk for 12 years as a teenager and went into the service because it offered free education, food and accommodation. I found this really interesting and wonder how many monks do the same for the same reasons and if this has ever been a consideration for Christian ministry in the past- particularly in places like Ireland etc. Another highlight was the food. Mr P and our two porters cooked us up a true feast of chicken and tofu roasted over the open fire, sticky rice and the most amazing vegetables which were wrapped in a banana leaf pouch and steamed over the fire also. They were amazing. We ate our fill of this, and beautiful fresh fruit under the canopy of the jungle, waterfall in the background, while sitting on a tarp of banana leaves. It was pretty magical. If you’re ever in Chiang Mai, I highly recommend doing a tour with Pooh’s Eco Trekking. They’re absolutely wonderful. 
  • At work, we’ve farewelled Jack but welcomed a new face to the team! Jing, who used to work in the kitchen is now back in Thailand so her little boy can go to school here! She’s so lovely and it’s been great getting to know her. P ohn, our current chef and my student, will be leaving us soon 😞 but Jing is super great so I’ll recover.
  • I went to an amazing dance performance which I understand less than half of. But it was very cool and I loved seeing the different styles of story telling they utilised 
  • I’ve been tutoring P ohn and Yim for the last two weeks, going over the menu and looking at our vocab words- linking verbs like slicing and dicing to the dishes they’re used in. We’ve also watched some videos which they narrated- naming the ingredients and actions of the chefs. 
  • It’s been really good to start getting to know Yim and P ohn a bit more- Yim showed me a video of her presenting her mum with a Mother’s Day present and P ohn told me how she was spoilt this weekend too. I showed them some pictures of my parents and am reliably informed that I look like them- a cross between, which is a good thing!
  • My bike tyres go flat very quickly which can make it very hard to ride with confidence. 
  • I’ve met some amazing people over here- the latest being a documentary film maker whose new project sounds so amazing I wouldn’t be surprised if we’re seeing it nominated for awards in the very near future
  • Speaking of documentaries, if you haven’t seen “I am not your negro” then you definitely should. Important and beautifully made and devastating film. I wish it weren’t so relevant. 
  • We’ve had some groups come through recently and it’s been cool to meet people who are so invested in helping grassroots organisations like FBC. If you’re coming to Chiang Mai with a school group or similar, please consider booking a visit with us! You get lunch, a talk and a q and a session. I also got to hear Seng Lao’s story for the first time. She’s one of our ex students who then worked in the cafe, kitchen and then in the office while preparing for uni- which is where she is now! The adversity which she has had to overcome makes me feel exceptionally guilty for any complaints I made about my own education experience and her gratitude and maturity are well beyond her years- though she’s lived through more than most of us ever will. 
  • I used this service called wash drop to wash my sheets and it was the greatest thing ever. I love clean sheets. 
  • Waxing is still an adventure every single time.
  • Thai massages are the best way to recover from hiking- but be prepared for tiny ladies to dig their elbows into your calves and hamstrings because they’re “so tight”. 
  • Only seen 4 rats. Heard more but walked into the road to avoid any chance of seeing them. Good life choice. 
  • Booked my River Kwai trip! I finally got the hotels.com issue sorted after a lot of (reasonably) calm but clearly pissed off interactions. I have decided I’m just doing it myself because then I can decide what I want to see and when. Accomodation is all sorted too! I’m staying in a bungalow on the river (not a hostel!)
  • Almost finished creating resources at work! I wish I was able to use existing stuff but I’m much too much of a control freak for that
  • Finally got to talk to my bestie this week. Makes a huge difference, even if it’s just a short burst 🙂 
  • Said goodbye to my new friend Jennifer on Sunday 😦 I’ll miss our foodie adventures and shared outrage over old white men being gross
  • Have slightly fallen in love with 10baht bags of chia seeds, collagen jelly (both with no sugar) filled up with hot soy milk. It’s so lovely- especially after getting caught in the rain! 
  • I’m getting better at avoiding/being prepared for the rain
  • I bought a cactus for my room! Well, it’s a family of cacti. I’ll introduce them soon. 
  • I have a watch tan. 
  • I’m constantly shocked by the smallness of the world. I visited a new church on Sunday (which I think will become my church) and I met a couple there who knows the Conibear family really well and hosts the group from Maranartha which comes everywhere- which I went to a trivia night to support when I was back in Melbourne! This is the second time I’ve met people with intimate connections to students. What even. 
  • It’s hard to update your voting details while overseas. Regardless, I’m trying! Voting is a right people died for and even in a non binding, non compulsory, totally unnecessary plebiscite, I intend to honour the responsibility that it is to vote. 
  • I have two sets of little dumbbells! Along with my TRX and resistance band, they’re making workouts a lot more fun!  
  • I did the fish spa thing. It was very weird and my friend Larissa and I were very giggly the whole time. 

Hopefully that’s a bit of an update on life in Chiang Mai! Miss you all- although apparently it was Parent Teacher Interviews recently so… not that much 😂 

Love you! 😘😘

Doi Pui- a day to remember.

There are some days that you’re just not going to forget, no matter how long it’s been since that fateful day and how many bumps on the head you have endured in the passing years. Yesterday was one of those days. As you know if you’ve been following this blog at all, I’m a bit of a fan of hiking and I’ve been loving weekly hikes to various spots in Chiang Mai. I’ve done Doi Suthep a few times, last week was a hike to PhuPing Palace and then yesterday, my walking group and I did the big one- Doi Pui. Over the course of 6 and a half hours, we traversed 16km of jungle terrain, both up and down (mostly up) and saw not only beautiful landscapes, views and villages but we also got to see some 13th century ruins, local farms, and insane trail runners taking part in a 160km “fun” run which lasts for three days.

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The hike, as usual started at 7:30, so I hopped on my bike around 6:45 so I could make it with plenty of time to pop to the market for a carb loading breakfast of plain sticky rice and boiled pumpkin (BEST.) and grab some snacks (almonds, apples and dried mixed fruit) for our epic adventure. I would later regret riding to our start point, but to be honest, it was nice to run the legs through the motions on the way home as a bit of active recovery!

As the clock ticked over to 7:30, our extremely efficient and organised leader hustled all 26 of us onto two songtaews who drove us to Huey Tung Tao Lake where the hike would begin. It started reasonably innocently; a flat field of ripening bananas stretched before us, leading to the base of some… significant… mountains. These were our destination. As we walked toward our start point, we joked about snakes until someone pointed out a, thankfully, headless one on the side of the road.

Right. I would NOT be advertising my Australianness nor would my eyes be straying from the trail too much. That said, I wasn’t overly concerned as our group was huuuuge and with the amount of noise we were making, I’m impressed we saw any wildlife at all. No live snakes materialised through the hike and the only encounter we had with any sort of animal was a leech on someone’s pants, mosquitos for days every time we stopped to wait and the obligatory rivers of ants which crisscrossed along the trail.

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Far too quickly, we reached the trailhead and started our relatively easy ascent to our first stop- the Helipad. This section of the hike was reasonably well marked, steep but smooth, and reasonably easy. For those playing at home, it was about the level of the lyrebird track in the middle… and the view was worth any discomfort. It was beautiful from the helipad and we all enjoyed snapping selfies, sharing our snacks and swapping stories about our backgrounds and what brought us to Chiang Mai. I always love this part of the treks- meeting everyone and hearing their stories. So many different people from different walks of life come to the mountain and trekking binds people together in a way that nothing else seems to. It must be the fact we see each other in all our sweaty glory- any pretence, language barrier or class fades away on the trail. All that matters is that you put one foot in front of the other and keep on walking.

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After a while, everyone started looking much too content and relaxed so our fearless leader prompted us to continue up the trail… and this- he warned us- was the hard part. And the snakiest bit.

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His warning was not unwarranted. BUT our next stop was the hill tribe village which had coffee so many people were definitely spurred on by this promise. It was an extremely steep climb and it was unrelenting. There really was, at many points, no end in sight, and it felt like you were just going to have to climb forever. At this stage, most conversation was at a minimum as we all focused on the path in front of us, the person in front of us, the poisonous snake that COULD be in front of us… But then we reached a ridge and we were suddenly between two valleys, overlooking fields and jungle. The views were unparalleled and completely different to those at the helipad, even within the same hike!

Image may contain: sky, cloud, ocean, plant, mountain, tree, outdoor and natureAfter a while, including many false finishes, we reached the hill tribe village were some workers deemed us crazy (we all agreed with them at this point) and we all had some coffee or tea. Some hikers also partook in some Thai energy/electrolyte drinks which they said certainly had an effect on them! The coffee the shops was using is grown in the hilltribes themselves and is apparently, excellent. Some trekkers bought some beans to take back with them. It was really amazing to visit the hill tribes- it wasn’t touristy and there was barely anything catered for “farang”, just the few coffee shops we spread ourselves between. It was clear that these people weren’t being exploited by trekking companies and being “sold” as living monuments but this was just their life and they acknowledged that sometimes, insane hikers would come through and coffee is always a big seller!

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After this, we set off to our highest point- the view point of Doi Pui. Our leader warned us that this part was also extremely steep- but that we wouldn’t notice because of the view. Now, to be fair, I think my legs noticed, but my breath wasn’t just taken away by the hike but by the landscape which stretched out far below me when we reached the top. We were above the clouds and the serenity was overwhelming. It was very peaceful and the mountain vistas were seriously calming. A cool breeze was ever present and all of a sudden, I felt like I could hike for days.

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Luckily, because we still had more to go.

Most of the rest of the way was downhill (not my fave) but this trail offered its own surprises like 13th century ruins and a cute little campsite which seemed to be basically abandoned- not many people came all the way up here. We eventually scrambled down to Phu Ping palace, slipping on muddy slopes and making me extremely glad that we had all agreed to take a songtaew from PP back to our meeting point. I hate down hills and today’s hike only confirmed that they hate me too.

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So, we hopped in the back of our red trucks, trundled down the hill and finally, after 6.5 hours reached our original start point. It was an incredible hike, a beautiful day, and an experience I’ll never forget. Many thanks to our fearless leader, the lovely Aussie I borrowed a long sleeve shirt from when it started to become EXTREMELY chilly and to the whole group who constantly encouraged each other through the hard bits and the easy bits.

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Next week, I’m going on a paid trek to Doi Inthanon and I’ll be honest, it’s going to have to be pretty amazing to beat this one, but I’m sure it’ll be incredible in its own spectacular way.

Missing you all. Will post a general life update soon.

Mwa!

Amy xx

Chiang Dao, or “The Day I Spent Emulating The Proclaimers”

I am on a budget- though, if you looked at the amount of money I spend on fruit, you probably wouldn’t get that impression- but I still want to do and see all the amazing things Chiang Mai and its surrounds has to offer, so when I had an extra day in my weekend due to the start of Buddhist Lent, I knew I wanted to make the most of it. After looking at some excellent blogs (like this one and this one) I knew I had found my cheap day out- and cheap it was! Not including food I spent under 500b. With food, it climbed to around 800b. A super budget day out. Now, as the title suggests, I spent A LOT of my day walking, which is partly why it was so cheap, but I actually loved this aspect of my day and while it was tiring and certainly a long day, I got to see parts of Chiang Dao that you never could on a bike- motor or otherwise.

I started my day early and caught the 40b 6am bus from Chang Phuak Station to Chiang Dao. The bus is really comfortable, not air con but with lots of fans on the ceiling which circulate the air so that it’s not stuffy in the slightest. That said, it was 6am and the bus was relatively empty- I had a seat to myself and many passengers were curled up across the 3 (lol) seater benches having a nap. I preferred to stare out the window and take in the changing landscape from city to highway to mountain jungle. It’s a beautiful road and if you can get a window seat, do.

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Once I got to Chiang Dao, I went and found a cute little spot for a traditional Thai brekky. I even got to practice some of my Thai, although I was also immensely grateful when the woman responded to my inquiries in perfect English. She said I was doing well though and everyone smiled when I commented that my food was “aroy makht” (very delicious!).

Full from my delicious larb and mango salad- not som tam but something slightly different- I decided to start my journey to the caves. My new favourite app ever, maps.me took me on a route which can only be described as “off the tourist track”. I was walking along roads which were passing behind local house, local farms, people just living their every day life. It was a fascinating walk and honestly, it was so interesting to see how these wonderful people lived and the lands they survived off. There were fully laden mango and jackfruit trees, bananas and longans drooping over me and SO much corn, EVERYWHERE.

The walk took roughly an hour, I would say and before long I found myself at the caves. I actually tried to do a “nature trail” but it was so unmarked that I couldn’t even tell where to go, 5 minutes in and my shins were already plastered in clay from climbing up muddy ascents. I quietly admitted defeat, turned around and to save some face, asked the bemused looking Thai man at the entrance of the caves, where the bathroom was. I quickly realised this probably meant it looked like I had just climbed through the jungle in search of a toilet, but I said it perfectly (for a farang) and he responded in kind.

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Anyway, after I recovered my pride, I ascended into the temple, paid my 40 baht entrance and was struck, as always, by the intricacy and beauty of the carvings, statues and icons which are features of every Buddhist Wat I’ve seen so far. Upon entry into the cave, I paid another 100b for a guide and then 100b as a compulsory tip? which I didn’t mind giving because those lamps are HEAVY and extremely HOT. It’s like, less than $3, who am I to begrudge a volunteer- my lovely lady was also disabled from birth- less than what I would unthinkingly spend on a chai back home? It’s easy to get pissy about being “ripped off” or “paying too much” because you’re a foreigner but honestly, it’s important to keep things in perspective.

The caves themselves were beautiful and eery. I loved being shown all the different cave formations, the guide explaining what they sort of looked like as we went through. There were bats on the cave roof but they didn’t bother me at all and it didn’t smell too bad.

The highlight was actually the unguided section where I was able to sit and reflect on my time in Thailand so far in absolute silence. It was so quiet that my ears were ringing, I could hear every move I made and it was just so… focused.

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After the caves, I made my way (on foot) along the road to the beautiful Wat Tham Pha Plong, taking in the stunning rainforest which surrounded me. The temple itself is set into the limestone caves with a few lookout points and peaks being built into the mountain. Once you get to the temple, it’s an easy climb of about 510 steps (and halfway there’s a rest stop if you need with an encouraging message of “you’ve climbed the hardest  2__ steps, only 3__ [easier!] steps to go!” Super cute!) which is lined in trees and proverbs from the Dharmma. Once again, it strikes me how similar some of these proverbs are to those in the Bible but how they’re all missing that overarching idea of grace- in Buddhism, one is always striving to be better and reach that ultimate place of “oneness”, whereas in my faith, we strive to be better because we’ve already been accepted- it’s a sense of gratefulness and desire to live the way God wants us to which drives our bettering… One thing I’ve always been grateful for, in regards to travel, is how much we can learn about our own selves and our own beliefs when they are placed next to those we do not subscribe to or which are foreign to us.

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Regardless, the temple itself was a stunning piece of architecture and offered beautiful views across the Chiang Dao Valley that I count myself blessed to see. The day was cloudy and drizzling all day but it didn’t dampen the views, my spirits or the beauty of the countryside. If anything, it just made everything seem even more lush!

After this, I’d definitely worked up an appetite and after walking past the beautiful Nest 2 on the way up and reading about how good the food was from every travel blog about Chiang Dao ever, I knew I had to stop there. The blogs did not lie. The service was impeccable; the setting, gorgeous; the food, delicious. I got a coconut (gotta get them electrolytes in) and a stirfried tofu dish which was so flavoursome! It was packed with galangal, lemongrass, mushrooms, greens, kaffir lime leaves, holy basil, and of course, a lot of chilli. It was absolutely divine and made according to my request of “farang spicy”. The hardest thing was choosing what to have! Yes, it’s more expensive than most of the places I eat in CM, but the serving size and the quality of ingredients certainly made up for it.

Feeling full as a coconut (not the one I had just quenched my thirst with), I made my way back into town, the same way I came- or so I thought. My app, which I still love, took me on a slightly different route which led me… DSC02358.JPG

literally into the middle of corn fields. I felt like I was in Fellowship of the Ring as I trekked my way through these fields, not knowing if I was even allowed to be in them. I was also getting worried at this point because all the photos I was taking and the use of my navigation system had worn my phone down to 1%. And I was in the middle of a field. It was a little terrifying. So, I took a lot of glances at my screen, trying to figure out how long it would take to get to where I needed to turn right and left in order to get to the bus station (which, btw, the bus didn’t drop me at in the morning, he just let me off in the centre of town). Halfway, roughly, to the station, the inevitable occurred and my phone died. I was here

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It was a little terrifying but I figured, as long as I followed the path- I’d be ok. And eventually, probably a lot longer than maps.me originally estimated, I got to the “suburbs” of Chiang Dao. Tired, nervous and seriously wanting to get to the bus station I happened upon a man sitting in his open front house, selling knick knacks and drinks. “Bus station?” I queried- not even bothering to try in Thai. “Yes, behind, behind.”

It was literally right behind me. The was just one barbed wire fence between me and the station. It was like the time Mum asked the policemen where Flinders St Station was while standing on the corner of Elizabeth and Collins (disclaimer: this was in our first year of being in Melbourne. Not recently.).

The man looked very amused as I celebrated, “Thank God! How do I…?”

“Tiny gate- just there”

It was not a gate. It was a gap between the barbed wire fence and the wall next door. But it looked like a well worn gap and no one official looking was around so I thanked him- in Thai- and squeezed my way through the gap.

And then the bus arrived. Literally 3 seconds after I did. I have no idea how many busses run from CD to CM in the afternoon but I was so grateful that I was on this one that I almost cried. I paid my 40 baht and hopped on a vastly different bus to the first one I experienced. This one, I was sharing a seat which would have sat 2 people comfortably, with 2 other people. Luckily, these Thai people were stereotypically tiny so we all fit… albeit very tightly.

I suddenly became extremely aware of how muddy I was and how ridiculous I must have looked but to be honest, I was too tired to even care.

That night, I was in bed by 8pm and 100% asleep by 9:30 at the absolute latest.

It was a stunning day and I loved every second of my adventures… especially how cheap it was! It just confirmed to me that you don’t need to spend big bucks to have a good time in Thailand. You just need to be willing to stretch those legs and see the world at a slower pace.

Have a blessed day!

Missing you all lots!

Amy x

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Random happenings in Chiang Mai

I feel quite settled into my new normal now.

For those of you who know me, you know I struggle massively with FOMO- fear of missing out. I want to do and experience everything. I want to go to every event, every exhibition, every gathering… but I’m also acutely aware that I can tire myself out by doing this… and I’m also prone to not wanting to be around people. It’s hard balance to figure out… especially when you’re in a place as magical as Chiang Mai. It does, at times, feel like a minute spent in my apartment is a minute I could be exploring, wasted.

But being here for 6 months, becoming part of this culture, is definitely freeing. It’s not like when I was in New York and waking up at 5:30 every morning and sleeping after midnight every night was normal and indeed, I would argue, necessary. It’s imperative that I get good sleep here because if I don’t my students and my volunteering work will suffer. That is not ok.

So, I’ve settled in. I’ve started to be ok with chilling out in my apartment and reading some nights. I’ve been going to bed nice and early and waking up early so I can get my workouts in before it gets too hot.

There are still things I want to do- the cabaret show, watching a boxing match, doing boxing classes, doing a few yoga classes, going to the elephant nature park, visiting the sticky waterfalls, going to Pai for a weekend, cycling to Huey Tung Tao Lake… but I have a long time here! I can do these things I just need to pace myself.

And honestly, just walking and cycling around this city is so magical the FOMO isn’t hitting me too hard.

On Sunday, for instance, as I rode home (in the rain I’ve just come to expect) I noticed a marching band on parade on the main street behind me. It seriously reminded me of a similar occurrence in NOLA, but with less glitter and more monks. I didn’t linger for this one though- my desire to stay dry and get my new yoga mat and lunch box home was a little too strong (again- self care progress!).

And, while on my weekly (when I’m in town/not otherwise occupied) hike up Doi Suthep we happened across a large group of university students who were also hiking up but had stopped to paint each others faces?? and were singing what sounded like a classic camp song, but in Thai.

 

Last evening, on my walk home, I stumbled across a stadium which was filled with people running around a track, a bunch of soccer players training, a muay thai boxing area, ladies dancing with umbrellas and MOST IMPORTANTLY, what appeared to be a join in zumba/aerobics class. I’m going that way again tonight to see if I can join in.

On my morning runs, I’ve noticed intricacies of the moat walls which I’ve missed while in songtaews or walking purposely, too focused to be looking at the scenery- which is all I do while running because you know, distraction is important when running.

I’ve started attending weekly Documentary Screenings at a cafe across the city and occasionally attending their Monday Night Movie night too. I’ve met some really interesting people through that and I’ve learnt loads too. Plus, the food at the cafe is delicious and super healthy.

I’ve found a couple of amazing markets very close to me, one of which has two huge salad bars where I can raw and steamed veggies, grains and beans for 10baht for 100g. I’ve learnt how to say “no sugar” when ordering fruit shakes and som tam. I’ve found super cheap fruit being sold in front of houses with no signage or any indication of a shop even existing.

I’ve visited two churches and while I liked both I think I’ll be attending the second, simply because it’s closer and therefore more sustainable- I can EASILY ride there and it’s very local. It’s also an earlier service which works for me and allows me to do more during the day.

At work, I’ve been developing a curriculum which can either be followed as is or deconstructed as teachers need it to be. I’ve just finished the intermediate class and tagged it for easy access. Next will be the beginner class which I’m a little nervous about because I have a tendency to pitch up (as seen in my overly ambitious plans for my work with Enrichment students during the first half of the year) and these students wouldn’t benefit from that at all. It will definitely be a challenge and one which I’m excited to take on. There is a wealth of resources available online and I’ll be tapping into those to get ideas before writing my own lesson plans.

At 1pm each day, we break for lunch which the kitchen staff prepare for us. It’s always DELICIOUS and I’ve tried things that I haven’t seen on any menu. It’s always fresh, healthy and super, super delicious. A favourite has been the mustard greens soup, the burmese paste (made with tomato, onion, chilli, peanuts, parsley… lots of delicious things!), the tea leaf salad… honestly just everything is so good.

I’ve also started learning Thai… slowly. I’m still very slow and I need to put some real study into the notes I’m taking but I feel like I’m making some progress. I know some words but I’d like to be able to hold a brief conversation with my uber driver or sticky rice vendor before I leave at the end of year.

Workout wise, I’ve put together a pretty good flow- Saturday (unless I have other plans) is a hike, Tuesday is a run, and then the rest of the week is an at home workout with my new yoga mat (thanks Daiso!), resistance band and my newly acquired fan (trying not to use my air con to save TFH money and also save the environment). I also did a workout with a friend I made at the girls nomad group which meets as the cafe Wednesday lunch  times! As much as I love working out by myself, it’s definitely a lot more fun with a friend and I really enjoyed our time together.

Speaking of friends, it’s been remarkably easy to make them. I’ve had a few dinners out with some girls, and the people I hike with are great value. I’m hoping to go out with one of the ladies in that group who’s been in town for a while soon so she can show me one of her favourite cafes/restaurants- which doesn’t have an English menu (basically a massive win in my book). Like I said, I’ve done a workout with one of the ladies in the group and went for a run with another, finishing with a market breakfast which was super delicious and resulted in a ridiculous amount of leftovers! But, it’s also been great to become (even more) comfortable in my own company. It’s a lot more acceptable  here to be by yourself and people no longer comment how brave I am to come over here alone- I’m just another nomad here… not a working digital nomad, but a nomad none the less. This is nice.

I’ve done some seriously cool stuff while here- I’ve been to the Lanna Fest which was a big cultural expo in International Exhibition and Cultural Centre which housed so many incredible stalls I didn’t get a chance to see them all. It was a little hard at times because it was CLEARLY a Thai event and as a farang, I struggled to communicate at times, but it was awesome anyway! I even got to taste some foods that I hadn’t wanted to buy a full one of because it didn’t really appeal which was very exciting.

I’ve also visited a variety of markets, one of them was an organic farmer’s market which is just around the corner and open on Sundays! I don’t anticipate my Melbourne ritual of Market-Church-Chill to be changing any time soon. While there, I got to experience my first “freeze frame” anthem play. At first I didn’t realise what the loud speaker was saying but it suddenly became clear when the chords started blaring and literally everyone in the market (99% Thai) stopped whatever they were doing and stood at attention. I had forgotten how respectful people in this country are toward their national anthem and their (royal) leaders in general. Different to say the least.

I’ve also been to the Saturday Walking Street… Sunday is next on the list… and the Night Bazaar. On Friday, I’m planning on heading to the Friday morning market which is  predominantly Chinese-Muslim and has some regional specialties that are very hard to find elsewhere. And then on Friday night is our graduation night for the last term!! I’m so looking forward to seeing the students in their traditional dress, being celebrated for their achievements.

Saturday is also something I’m REALLY looking forward to- a cooking class! I’ve missed cooking a lot since being here- though less than I thought I would- maybe because the food is just SO damn good- and I’m really looking forward to getting back in front of a wok. The class I’ve chosen is the Thai Akha Cooking Class which not only teaches you the usual things but also teaches you three Akha (a hill tribe in Northern Thailand) dishes. I’m really looking forward to learning the difference between this region and culture and “normal” Thai food.

I’ve also organised a little day trip for myself for Monday (as we have the day off) up to Chiang Dao caves. I’ll be taking the local bus and then exploring the town when I get there! I’m so looking forward to it and it should be a real test of my adventurous, independent spirit.

Keen!

Hoping you’re all well, surviving the freezing cold, and embracing the Melbourne vibes which I actually am missing a bit.

Love you all lots,

Amy xx

 

Poem- Same Same

The air here smells different.
It feels different.

My hair blows with a different scent and
my sweat takes a different trail as it
snakes down my calves.

My eyes are clearer and
my skin is sticky with the juice of mango, coconut, inspiration.

I can feel more of the things that matter to
the One who everything matters to

I take more

Time

I give more

Time

I have more

Time

To rest and be

In
This
Place

In
This
Space

In
This
Breath

Of a moment that is all too fleeting and which moves like the canal before the rain.

Steady as she flows.

The air here smells different.

The warmth here is of a different sun and yet
the rays which tattoo my skin with indelible ink are the same which

pierce through the fog on a
different mountain top with
a different mud to that which bathed my legs today.

a different mountain with different sounds
which I miss in a numb throb which awakens only
while waiting for clothes to wash or shoes to dry.

The air here smells different;
Intermingling of gas and spice.

It sounds different here
Confident inflections which do more than
reveal the self doubt I’m leaving behind
pepper the atmosphere with a sense
of
Something I Can’t Control.

The air here smells different.
It feels different.
Or maybe it’s just
me.

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We’ll all float on okay… Day 2 of BKK

 

After waking from my food coma, I found myself excitedly waiting for the floating market tour. Initially, I intended to walk down the road a bit, grab a bag of freshly sliced fruit before heading back to the bus but due, I assume to the tourist led nature of Khao San Rd area, there was a distinct lack of vendors out and about and I was starting to fret that I wouldn’t be back for my hotel pick up at 7:30am.

I needn’t have worried because today was my first experience of Thai Time! I don’t think the tour left until around 8ish which resulted in me becoming increasingly stressed as I loitered in front of my hotel, eyeballing any tour guide which came close to looking like they were leading a floating market tour.

Eventually, my van arrived and accompanied by a lovely mother and daughter from the US (interestingly, most of my tour companions have been US or UK based… the glut of tourists in CM seem to be Chinese, Korean, US, UK… not nearly as many Australians as I was expecting- probably because they go south to the Islands) I hopped in for another whirlwind morning.

We headed out of the crazily busy city along the highway until we reached a train track! I was a little confused at first but the tour guide explained that we were first going to a market which was set up along a train track… a working one! At 9am the train would come chugging along through the market and all the vendors would lift their awnings, shift their goods and pull stupid farangs and their selfie sticks out of the path of the train. It was very bizarre and I felt almost like I was in some sort of surrealist, Inception style landscape where things weren’t as they should be but everyone just accepted them as normal.

The market sold lots of fresh, cooked and dried food (including fresh coconuts which I gratefully consumed) as well as touristy souvenirs and clothes. While it was centred on the train line, it definitely spread further but we didn’t have time to explore a lot. We had a schedule and it must be kept. Well, as much possible. We had a couple on our tour that kept turning up late. It was infuriating and I felt slightly comforted by the fact my teacherish frustration was shared by the Thai tour guide who actually admonished them at one point because the man decided it was a great idea to go to the toilet when we were next in line for the long boat tour… after already arriving 10 minutes late to our meeting point.

Anyway, after the train market, we hopped back on the van to travel to the Damnoen Saduak Floating Market, the best known market and the most touristy, but a really great opportunity to see what the traditional markets were like. We hopped on a slow boat tour which led us around the canals to see all the spice shops, the carvings, the fans, the carvings, and the sarongs. I felt kind of bad because I decided not to buy anything/ couldn’t fit anything into my already overstuffed bag so every stall we went to, I just had to keep saying “no, thank you” over and over again, but I’m sure they’re used to it by now.

After the boat tour, we alighted to explore the rest of the market on foot. By this stage, I was getting pretty hungry (no breakfast=unhappy Amy) but the prices were RIDICULOUS. At the street food tour, the pad thai we ate (remembering that it’s been dubbed the best in Thailand) was between 40-90 baht for the normal sizes depending on what meat you got etc. At the floating market, it was 120-170 baht. INSANE.

Anyway, after wandering around for a while and eating some mango, we hopped on another boat- this time a long tailed speed boat which took us around the canals to see how many of the locals live. It was fascinating and very relaxing. Upon reflection, it became a bit more poignant. I’m probably the last generation to see this way of life being lived in Bangkok. BKK is sinking- the poor management of crops throughout northern and central Thailand has led to immense flooding every wet season in BKK and coupled with rising sea levels, this is spelling disaster for those who live in this chaotic but charismatic city. Many who can are leaving Bangkok but for those who can’t and for the myriad of business and companies based in the capital, this environmental problem is going to lead to disaster. Nothing much has been done either which is doubly concerning. Let us hope and pray that soon, those who can do something, will.

After this sobering boat ride, we came back home and I decided to enjoy my massage which was also included in my welcome pack. Divine, and perfect after a long semester and a long bout of air travel, sleeping on the floor/curled up in a chair in Changi and then a morning of bus travel. It wasn’t super hard (not like my AMAZING experience in Chiang Mai) but I was too afraid to say “harder” in case the tiny man on my back broke me (not a euphemism. He literally sat on my back when massaging me).

The day ended with me chilling out on my rooftop, next to the pool, reading my book. I’m learning to take everything a bit easier while I’m here in Thailand and I think this has been something God’s been wanting to teach me for a while. So, while I was annoyed at the lateness of the van in the morning and the tardiness of my fellow traveller, it didn’t ruin my day. It wasn’t the end of the world. It certainly doesn’t matter anymore and to be honest, the only reason I remembered was because I wrote it down in my journal.

I’m just so thankful to be here and my time in BKK, while brief, was such fun. It set the tone for the rest of my trip and so far, it’s only gone north…

Literally.

Next time, I’ll fill you in on what I’ve been up to in CM and eventually, I’ll write about Ayuthaya too. Let me know if there’s anything you want to know, specifically and I can try to answer J

Love, love, love!

Amy x

[Two] nights in Bangkok- Day One

Apologies for the heinously cliche blog title but I love me a good piece of politcially allegorical musical theatre and I love me a bit of Bangkok too.

But I think, only a bit.

I spent my first 2 days in the original Sin City of Thailand and it was everything I was expecting and more- overwhelming, busy, chaotic and delicious.

I knew I wanted to make the most out of my time in BKK but not be so wrecked by the time I arrived in CM for my volunteer experience so I definitely scheduled in both exciting activities and active relaxtion time.

Let’s begin!

I arrived at 8:30 on Sunday morning- not the best time to get to a new city, I’ll be honest. It’s tempting to let jet lag and the weariness of travel overwhelm you and just nap and so, knowing this, I chose (to the utter disbelief of everyone I met) to go on a cycle tour of the city in the afternoon followed by a food tour by tuk tuk which finished up around 11:30. Perfect!

And it was. I was picked up by a driver (a perk of my Stray Arrival Pack), got to my lovely hotel, the Dewan, in good time- mesmerised by the changing vistas outside the airconditioned comfort of the car as we sped along the highway and bustled through the traffic which is synonymous with many cities but especially Bangkok.

I checked in super easily, immediately found myself a coconut to sip on (unfortunately, it wasn’t very good- but fortunately, the only bad one I’ve had!) and wandered through a VERY quiet Khao San road area to the Stray Shop. It was dead- everyone was sleeping off big Saturday nights and the vibe was decidedly one of hazey regrets. I didn’t mind KS area, but to be honest, next time I’m in BKK I’d rather stay somewhere a bit less tourist focused, the bars and nightclub scene is just not really my jam and I found the constant presence of pasta, pizza and burgers intrusive. There were little street food vendors around but their prices were significantly higher than many of the places I’ve been since.

That said- the Dewan was awesome and I’d stay there again in a heart beat.

After popping into the Stray Shop to confirm all the details of my tours on Monday, I walked to the pier and caught the tourist boat down the river to where my bike tour was starting. It was so lovely and the cool breeze was stunning in  the heat. I was hoping to just catch the local boat but I wasn’t sure what boat was what and in my worry that I wouldn’t make in time for the tour, I caved. The tourist boat was probably much more expensive but ultimately? It’s hardly an issue. It was still only just over $1. It was a beautiful way of getting around the city and I would highly recommend the river over the road.

Once I located Co van Kessel bike tours, (right next to a Coffee Club- dubbed as being home of Australia’s favourite brunch… um, sure CC.) I grabbed lunch from a local hole in the wall and then, it was time for the tour! We had a few Dutchies (the man who originally started this now Thai run company was Dutch), a few Brits, a couple of Australians and a lady from the Philippines. I was the only one wearing a helmet so Mother, you should be proud I didn’t bow to peer pressure etc. The bikes were great quality and very comfortable.

The tour was so interesting! We rode through the back streets of China Town, around some very extravagant houses and past some places where it was clear the people were only just scraping by. We rode, precariously, through tiny alleys and even through busy market places. I will admit, I felt a bit intrusive at times and did wonder how good this voyuerism was for the community, but they didn’t really pay attention to this bevy of white folk trundling past on our cycles. We also boarded a shuttle ferry and went to the quieter side of the city and visited a temple which was just beautiful. I’m constantly struck by the respect and devotion that the Thai’s have toward their faith and while I’m glad that, as a Christian, I’m not bound to any physical expressions of my faith, but rather spiritual ones, it certainly causes me to pause and think if I’m really giving my faith the respect God’s glorious grace deserves.

We also visited the flower market- absolutely one of my favourite places in BKK. Filled with spices, tea, flowers and fruit, this place is a feast for the senses and the intricacies of the flower designs blow me and my fat fingers away. I almost bought my weights worth of spices and teas but showed a modicum of self control knowing I’m not allowed to bring anything into the country- least of all, tea (though that rule is probably more heavily monitored by my father than customs).

We finished up the tour, along with some fruit and random Thai snacks, at about 4:30, giving me time to walk to the meeting point for my next tour- the street food extravaganza!

This was run by Bangkok Food Tours and was faultless. We hopped into the waiting tuk tuks and were ferried around all night until we were full to bursting. We sampled some traditional Northern food (tom yum, duck larb, sticky rice, grilled tilapia, cucumber salad), had a version of pad see ew which you could get with either a runny egg or cooked, omeletteish egg. I got the runny egg and it was delicious. Because the egg was cracked in with the food, hot from the wok, it cooked slowly and became the most delicious sauce. We also had mango sticky rice, a few little desserts, longan, and pad thai from the most famous pad thai in BKK. It’s featured in a bunch of TV shows, the Guardian rated it as the best “fast food” in the world in 2014 and it is consistently busy. I had the modern version (which is the one I’d seen on Luke Nguyen’s show) and while it was delicious and looked amazing, it was a little sweet. I preferred my friend’s traditional version which was less attractive but less sweet. I’m yet to try any other Pad Thai over here though so it remains to be seen if it is the best.

We finished the night atop a rooftop bar overlooking the river where I had a mocktail and enjoyed the rain and the city lights. We were then each dropped around the city to our various hotels, concluding the night in comfort and style.

I slowly climbed the stairs to my room and collapsed into bed… looking forward to my floating market tour and massage which I had in store for tomorrow….

Though not before brushing my teeth with local water…a decision that thankfully, didn’t hamper too much of my much needed sleep.

Day Two, coming soon.

Amy xx