We’ll all float on okay… Day 2 of BKK

 

After waking from my food coma, I found myself excitedly waiting for the floating market tour. Initially, I intended to walk down the road a bit, grab a bag of freshly sliced fruit before heading back to the bus but due, I assume to the tourist led nature of Khao San Rd area, there was a distinct lack of vendors out and about and I was starting to fret that I wouldn’t be back for my hotel pick up at 7:30am.

I needn’t have worried because today was my first experience of Thai Time! I don’t think the tour left until around 8ish which resulted in me becoming increasingly stressed as I loitered in front of my hotel, eyeballing any tour guide which came close to looking like they were leading a floating market tour.

Eventually, my van arrived and accompanied by a lovely mother and daughter from the US (interestingly, most of my tour companions have been US or UK based… the glut of tourists in CM seem to be Chinese, Korean, US, UK… not nearly as many Australians as I was expecting- probably because they go south to the Islands) I hopped in for another whirlwind morning.

We headed out of the crazily busy city along the highway until we reached a train track! I was a little confused at first but the tour guide explained that we were first going to a market which was set up along a train track… a working one! At 9am the train would come chugging along through the market and all the vendors would lift their awnings, shift their goods and pull stupid farangs and their selfie sticks out of the path of the train. It was very bizarre and I felt almost like I was in some sort of surrealist, Inception style landscape where things weren’t as they should be but everyone just accepted them as normal.

The market sold lots of fresh, cooked and dried food (including fresh coconuts which I gratefully consumed) as well as touristy souvenirs and clothes. While it was centred on the train line, it definitely spread further but we didn’t have time to explore a lot. We had a schedule and it must be kept. Well, as much possible. We had a couple on our tour that kept turning up late. It was infuriating and I felt slightly comforted by the fact my teacherish frustration was shared by the Thai tour guide who actually admonished them at one point because the man decided it was a great idea to go to the toilet when we were next in line for the long boat tour… after already arriving 10 minutes late to our meeting point.

Anyway, after the train market, we hopped back on the van to travel to the Damnoen Saduak Floating Market, the best known market and the most touristy, but a really great opportunity to see what the traditional markets were like. We hopped on a slow boat tour which led us around the canals to see all the spice shops, the carvings, the fans, the carvings, and the sarongs. I felt kind of bad because I decided not to buy anything/ couldn’t fit anything into my already overstuffed bag so every stall we went to, I just had to keep saying “no, thank you” over and over again, but I’m sure they’re used to it by now.

After the boat tour, we alighted to explore the rest of the market on foot. By this stage, I was getting pretty hungry (no breakfast=unhappy Amy) but the prices were RIDICULOUS. At the street food tour, the pad thai we ate (remembering that it’s been dubbed the best in Thailand) was between 40-90 baht for the normal sizes depending on what meat you got etc. At the floating market, it was 120-170 baht. INSANE.

Anyway, after wandering around for a while and eating some mango, we hopped on another boat- this time a long tailed speed boat which took us around the canals to see how many of the locals live. It was fascinating and very relaxing. Upon reflection, it became a bit more poignant. I’m probably the last generation to see this way of life being lived in Bangkok. BKK is sinking- the poor management of crops throughout northern and central Thailand has led to immense flooding every wet season in BKK and coupled with rising sea levels, this is spelling disaster for those who live in this chaotic but charismatic city. Many who can are leaving Bangkok but for those who can’t and for the myriad of business and companies based in the capital, this environmental problem is going to lead to disaster. Nothing much has been done either which is doubly concerning. Let us hope and pray that soon, those who can do something, will.

After this sobering boat ride, we came back home and I decided to enjoy my massage which was also included in my welcome pack. Divine, and perfect after a long semester and a long bout of air travel, sleeping on the floor/curled up in a chair in Changi and then a morning of bus travel. It wasn’t super hard (not like my AMAZING experience in Chiang Mai) but I was too afraid to say “harder” in case the tiny man on my back broke me (not a euphemism. He literally sat on my back when massaging me).

The day ended with me chilling out on my rooftop, next to the pool, reading my book. I’m learning to take everything a bit easier while I’m here in Thailand and I think this has been something God’s been wanting to teach me for a while. So, while I was annoyed at the lateness of the van in the morning and the tardiness of my fellow traveller, it didn’t ruin my day. It wasn’t the end of the world. It certainly doesn’t matter anymore and to be honest, the only reason I remembered was because I wrote it down in my journal.

I’m just so thankful to be here and my time in BKK, while brief, was such fun. It set the tone for the rest of my trip and so far, it’s only gone north…

Literally.

Next time, I’ll fill you in on what I’ve been up to in CM and eventually, I’ll write about Ayuthaya too. Let me know if there’s anything you want to know, specifically and I can try to answer J

Love, love, love!

Amy x

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